Chevre Goats CheeseNothing tastes better than homemade cheese, this recipe is no exception since it is so easy to make!

A few years ago Curt and I took a cheese making class. It was a lot of fun, not difficult, and the finished cheese was amazing. Given the high cost of most foods these days I highly recommend making your own if possible. Making Chevre cheese is one of the easiest cheeses to make, Chevre is a rich and creamy tasting fresh cheese from goat milk.

After making your Chevre Cheese you might like to try it in our favorite  Portobella Mushroom Stuffed with Chevre Cheese recipe.

Here’s a terrific recipe from Cultures for Health that we like…

What you need:

  • 1 gallon goat milk (use a high quality milk preferably from a local farm)
  • 1 packet Chevre Starter Culture (available here)
  • Butter Muslin (very fine weave cheese cloth, buy it here)
  • A large pot with a lid (if metal, be sure it’s non-reactive such as stainless steel)
  • A wooden spoon
  • A Thermometer
  • A Chevre Shaping Mold (optional)

Chevre Instructions:

  1. Heat your milk to 86 degrees (please note, if using raw milk, this process will not pasteurize the milk).
  2. Remove the milk from the heat and thoroughly stir in the packet of Chevre culture.
  3. Cover the pot and leave the milk/cheese to culture for 12 hours at approximately 72 degrees (generally kitchen room temperature).
  4. After 12 hours, the cheese should look like yogurt (solid if tipped but still relatively soft).  You may see some whey separating from the cheese. The whey is a mostly clear liquid.
  5. Place a piece of butter muslin (doubled) in a colander in a bowl.  Gently spoon the Chevre into the butter muslin.  Gather the corners of the muslin up and tie knots to secure.
  6. Hang the butter muslin filled with the Chevre over a bowl so the whey can drain.  An easy way to do this is to tie the butter muslin around a cupboard handle so the bowl to catch the whey can rest on the counter underneath.
  7. Allow the Chevre to drain for 6-12 hours to reach the desired consistency (see below).
  8. Flavor Chevre with herbs if desired.  You can mix in fresh or dried herbs.  Alternatively you can mold the Chevre and then roll it in the herbs.

Generally speaking, Chevre will stay good in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Draining Options:

  • You can choose not to drain the Chevre at all which will leave you with a delicious and thick yogurt (this is our favorite method for making goat yogurt).  A small amount of draining (less than 6 hours) will yield an even thicker yogurt-type of food.
  • Drain the Chevre for approximately 6 hours for a soft, spreadable cheese.
  • Drain the Chevre for approximately 12 hours for a cream cheese consistency.

Uses for Chevre Cheese:

  • Spread on your favorite crackers, bagels, toast, etc. like you would cream cheese.
  • In recipes in place of other soft cheeses such as ricotta, mascarpone, cream cheese, etc.
  • In place of sour cream
  • In a parfait with fruit and honey
  • Add a little sweetener and use Chevre to frost cupcakes (particularly delicious on carrot cake in place of cream cheese frosting)

Storing Chevre Cheese:

  • Generally speaking, Chevre will stay good in the refrigerator for up to one week.
  • Chevre can be frozen but be sure to:
  • Salt the Chevre well prior to freezing
  • Remove as much of the whey as possible (use a cheese press if you have one available); the drier the Chevre, the better it will freeze

More of our delicious recipes;

Portobella Mushrooms Stuffed with Chevre Cheese

Evelyn’s REAL Veggie Burger Recipe (this is excellent with homemade Chevre Cheese!)

Wheat Berry and White Bean Salad

Thyme-Crusted Sablefish

Evelyn Vincent Evelyn Vincent

Native Plant Landscaper, Gardener, Labyrinth Design, Feng Shui Practitioner,  Aromatherapy / Essential Oils, Big Fan of Nature and Living Simply.

"There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it's going to be a butterfly."
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