The Touch of the Earth

The old people came literally to love the soil and they sat or reclined on the ground with a feeling of being close to a mothering power. It was good for the skin to touch the earth and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth. Their tipis were built upon the earth and their altars were made of earth. The birds that flew in the air came to rest upon the earth and it was the final abiding place of all things that lived and grew. The soil was soothing, strengthening, cleansing and healing. That is why the old Indian still sits upon the earth inst...
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Some thoughts: He fits into the landscape

Fitting into the landscape is a lifestyle it is not a means of camouflage. It means to be at peace and work with what is available to live your life. You never take more than you need and you give back what you can so that life can continue. You don't consume as in today's western way of thinking. You think and live your life concerned for generations unconceived. You think about how your actions affect the environment. You are respectful to and honor all your relations - as the Lakota say: mitakuye oyasin. You remember your roots, where you came from.
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He fits into the landscape

The American Indian is of the soil, whether it be the region of the forests, plains, pueblos or mesas. He fits into the landscape, for the hand that fashioned the continent also fashioned the man. He once grew as naturally as the wild sunflowers; he belongs just as the buffalo belonged... Luther Standing Bear (1868-1929) Oglala Sioux Chief
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Some thoughts: A relative I am!

The four quarters. The East, South, West and North. From Black Elk Speaks: "...west where the thunder beings live to send us rain; …the north, whence comes the great white cleansing wind; …the east, whence springs the light and where the morning star lives to give men wisdom;… the south, whence come the summer and the power to grow." For any native culture these are very important and drive their daily and yearly life. These directions have power. By declaring "A relative I am" one says that we are all related, we have kinship. In this prayer you acknowledge that we, as human incar...
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Some thoughts: The Land

The land is very important to indigenous cultures. They live on it. They derive sustenance from it. When they die they become part of it physically. Native cultures believe in  interconnectedness and interrelations of all things. That we are all one. We are all related. Some take it a step further and believe that we are each other. The Dhammapada stanza 5 says "... If you see yourself in others then whom can you injure?" Other cultures may have similar concepts. Bringing the Dhammapada together with Mitakuye Oyasin you then get the concept  behind... "The land I stand on is my bod...
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Some thoughts: What is Life?

To indigenous cultures - those that still follow the old ways - the question isn't "what is life?" but rather "what isn't life?" The Lakota have a prayer that begins "Mitakuye Oyasin " which means all are related. We are all one. Everything is connected. Working with the understanding that indigenous cultures  are centered around the family and tribe - everyone does what they can to help everyone else. Everyone is related and helps. This concept can be extended to everything around us because the creator created everything to be of help to us. Stone helps us. Trees help us. Mud, deer,...
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